The Neglected College Race Gap: Racial Disparities Among College Completers - May 2018

The Neglected College Race Gap: Racial Disparities Among College Completers - May 2018

This issue brief released by the Center for American Progress shows that Black and Hispanic graduates would have received 1 million additional bachelor’s degrees between 2013 and 2015 had they earned degrees at the same rate as their white peers.

Racial Equity: Getting to Results

Racial Equity: Getting to Results

The Government Alliance on Race and Equity announces a new tool, Racial Equity: Getting to Results, developed to assist jurisdictions use a racial equity lens to identify a set of metrics and implement a community process to have greater impact in their work. 

Reducing Racial Wealth Inequalities in Greater Boston: Building a Shared Agenda - May 2017

Reducing Racial Wealth Inequalities in Greater Boston: Building a Shared Agenda - May 2017

Through a six-month process of deep learning convened by the Boston Fed and facilitated by external consultant Cynthia Silva Parker, senior associate at the Interaction Institute for Social Change, the working group studied the root causes of racial wealth inequalities, prioritized possible solutions, and created a shared agenda.

AWAKE to WOKE to WORK: Building a Race Equity Culture - May 2018

AWAKE to WOKE to WORK: Building a Race Equity Culture - May 2018

This report by Equity in the Center and ProInspire identifies the personal beliefs and behaviors, cultural characteristics, operational tactics, and practices that accelerate measurable progress toward race equity. It offers a roadmap for making racial equity a core focus for organizations working for positive social change.

Racial Inequities, Policy Solutions: Perceptions of Boston’s Communities of Color on Racism and Race Relations - March 2018

Racial Inequities, Policy Solutions: Perceptions of Boston’s Communities of Color on Racism and Race Relations - March 2018

Report commissioned by Hyams Foundation and conducted by The MassINC Polling Group polled Asian, Black, Latino and white voters in Boston in Nov 2017 on a range of issues including education, criminal justice, race relations, and economic opportunity. This comprehensive, first-of-its kind report shows policy priorities for people of color in Boston. 

Business Case for Racial Equity: A Strategy for Growth - April 2018

Business Case for Racial Equity: A Strategy for Growth - April 2018

The United States economy could be $8 trillion larger by 2050 if the country eliminated racial disparities in health, education, incarceration and employment. This report seeks to expand the narrative associated with racial equity by adding a compelling economic argument to the social justice goal.

Closing the Women's Wealth Gap | January 2017

Closing the Women's Wealth Gap | January 2017

Closing the Women’s Wealth Gap—What It Is, Why It Matters, and What Can Be Done About It aims to inform a national discussion about the women’s wealth gap, and to catalyze movement towards policy and practical solutions that build wealth for low-income women and women of color.

The Color of Wealth in Boston | March 2015

The Color of Wealth in Boston | March 2015

This analysis by the Boston Federal Reserve bank focused on the net wealth for U.S. born blacks, Caribbean blacks, Cape Verdeans, Puerto Ricans, and Dominicans in Boston. The analysis shows that the net worth of whites as compared with nonwhites is staggeringly divergent.

Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap | 2017

Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap | 2017

This paper explores a number of these popular explanations for the racial wealth gap, looking at individual differences in education, family structure, full- or part-time employment, and consumption habits.

What We Get Wrong About Closing the Racial Wealth Gap | April 2018

What We Get Wrong About Closing the Racial Wealth Gap | April 2018

This report addresses ten commonly held myths about the racial wealth gap in the United States. It contends that a number of ideas frequently touted as “solutions” will not make headway in reducing black-white wealth disparities.